Sunday, April 29, 2018

Countries will DENY Entry at Immigration and send you back home | Vacati...

DENIED ENTRY at IMMIGRATION

Learn about which countries you need to double check on, before you book a trip there and wind up denied at Immigration.





Imagine weeks to months of planning, dishing out thousands of dollars, on Hotels, Flights, Passports and Visas, taking days off of work, rushing to the airport, sitting on a plane for many hours just to get to a country and not be allowed in. This nightmare has happened to a few of the Kings and Queens and on this episode we are going to discuss some of the countries that may even do the same thing to you.




People can be deemed inadmissible to certain for a wide variety of reasons. Having a VISA does not guarantee you entry to a country, it only guarantees you the right to travel to a port of entry. It is the role of the immigrations officer to determine whether or not to grant you entry. Some people have asked me about certain countries and although this question needs to be answered on a case by case basis, I sent this question out on my FB Group Page and Twitter page asking if anyone has been denied entry to any countries.

1st was Panama: One young woman said: Me and my boyfriend were both sent back to the US. Yes we were able to get passports but every country is different. Once we exited the gate customs were waiting for us they then took us into an office and told us we were red flagged. Mind you I was convicted at the age of 18 and i am now 25. They sent us right back to Miami we couldn t transfer to anywhere else from there either. So double check before booking not only did we lose out on money but our time as well. And let me not forget these customs that we dealt with were beyond rude. They took our phones and passports while we waited for the next flight out to Miami which was 12 hrs later. you are two idiots !!!
And another person answered: YOU CAN NOT TRAVEL TO PANAMA WITH A CRIMINAL RECORD ,YOU CANT EVEN HAVE A LAY OVER THERE.
IM SPEAKING FOR EXPERIENCE I LOST a lot of MONEY AND TIME when I tried.

2ndly was Canada: Unfortunately, getting into Canada with a DUI is not as simple as showing up at the border with a valid United States passport. If you have ever been arrested or convicted for driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, regardless of whether it was a misdemeanor or felony offense, you may be criminally inadmissible to Canada and denied entry. Regardless of whether or not you have any intention to drive while in the country, a DUI (including civil infractions and "Actual Physical Control DUI" violations) can cause you to get turned away at the border. There are 2 ways to overcome this : 1 The first option is a Temporary Resident Permit (TRP), which lets a person enter or stay in Canada for a specific period of time provided they have a valid reason to visit
nd 2:  Criminal Rehabilitation, which is an application process whereby a person petitions Canada immigration authorities to forgive their prior DUI conviction. To be eligible to apply for Criminal Rehab, five years must have passed since the completion of your sentence which includes payment of fines, driving courses, community service, probation, and any other conditions which may have been imposed on you. But thats for DUI's   In order for a US FELON to be granted entry to Canada you have to have a certificate of rehabilitation issued by the Canadian embassy. The main consideration is the severity of the crime and how long ago it was. Also, they consider the crime based on Canadian law, so the misdemeanor DUI you got here might be a felony in Canada.

Japan: 1 person said:I went to Japan for grad school classes, but either the university or the justice ministry screwed up some paperwork for my visa (apparently my name was misspelled), so I was told to just come in and have everything settled on the ground. I explained the situation to the immigration officer and was promptly taken off to detention for a couple of hours, during which time I was formally denied entry and then told (by a friendly immigration officer) to write an appeal in longhand. The appeal was granted while I waited, and I got a "special entry permit" in my passport which was good for a year. Apparently they were not procedurally allowed to admit me as a student without a visa, but they had more leeway to make a determination on appeal. In the detention area, I came across several Asian and Eastern European tourists who were trying to transit without visas, as well as an American guy who had apparently been deported in the past and was trying to get back in; his case required an overnight stay at a guarded hotel room in NRT.

one last thing is dual citezen ship. I lot of people feel there are bragging right s to be had for having more than one passport, but be very careful at customs all over the world. Showing off multiple nationalities is generally an extremely bad idea. People report machine guns pointed at us them in Cuba and one person being yelled at by US immigration telling him he has 10 minutes to choose his nationality and that saying the wrong answer could leave him with a fine of up to 50thousand and 6 months in Jail.

You will be sent back on the first available flight. If there is no flight that day, you will be taken to a detention centre before being brought back to the airport once a suitable flight has been found. It is the airline’s responsibility to pay for your stay in the detention centre as well as the law enforcement officers who will escort you there and back to the airport. Again, the airline has the right to recover these costs from you.

Yes, it is the airline’s responsibility to fly you either back to the point of embarkation, or to a country where you will be admitted (i.e: your home country) if you are deemed inadmissible at your destination.

However, this does not mean that the airline won’t try to recover the cost from you. They can use your return flight if you have one, or ask you to pay for a new ticket. If you don’t have a return ticket and not enough money to pay, they may let you use the phone to call friends or relatives. In extreme cases they may extend a line of credit to you in your home country.